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Tag: cancer

KLF2 induces the senescence of pancreatic cancer cells by cooperating with FOXO4 to upregulate p21 – ScienceDirect

KLF2 induces the senescence of pancreatic cancer cells by cooperating with FOXO4 to upregulate p21 – ScienceDirect

“In this study, we showed that overexpression of KLF2 induced the senescence of pancreatic cancer cells and inhibited tumorigenesis, and knockdown of KLF2 inhibited senescence and p21 expression. In the molecular mechanism study, KLF2 was found to interact with FOXO4 and cooperated with FOXO4 to induce the expression of p21.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001448271930669X

The strange case of AMPK and cancer: Dr Jekyll or Mr Hyde?† | Open Biology

The strange case of AMPK and cancer: Dr Jekyll or Mr Hyde?† | Open Biology

“The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a cellular energy sensor. Once switched on by increases in cellular AMP : ATP ratios, it acts to restore energy homeostasis by switching on catabolic pathways while switching off cell growth and proliferation. The canonical AMP-dependent mechanism of activation requires the upstream kinase LKB1, which was identified genetically to be a tumour suppressor. AMPK can also be switched on by increases in intracellular Ca2+, by glucose starvation and by DNA damage via non-canonical, AMP-independent pathways. Genetic studies of the role of AMPK in mouse cancer suggest that, before disease arises, AMPK acts as a tumour suppressor that protects against cancer, with this protection being further enhanced by AMPK activators such as the biguanide phenformin. However, once cancer has occurred, AMPK switches to being a tumour promoter instead, enhancing cancer cell survival by protecting against metabolic, oxidative and genotoxic stresses. Studies of genetic changes in human cancer also suggest diverging roles for genes encoding subunit isoforms, with some being frequently amplified, while others are mutated.”

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsob.190099?utm_source=researcher-app&utm_medium=researcherad&utm_campaign=DVaughan_Promotedpaper_190099&utm_content=Paper

Medicinal Mushrooms (PDQ®)

Medicinal Mushrooms (PDQ®)

“Medicinal mushrooms have been used for hundreds of years, mainly in Asian countries, for treatment of infections. More recently, they have also been used in the treatment of pulmonary diseases and cancer. Medicinal mushrooms have been approved adjuncts to standard cancer treatments in Japan and China for more than 30 years and have an extensive clinical history of safe use as single agents or combined with radiation therapy or chemotherapy.More than 100 species of medicinal mushrooms are used in Asia. Some of the more commonly used species include Ganoderma lucidum (reishi), Trametes versicolor or Coriolus versicolor (turkey tail), Lentinus edodes (shiitake), and Grifola frondosa (maitake).Studies have examined the effects of mushrooms on immune response pathways and on direct antitumor mechanisms. The immune effects are mediated through the mushrooms stimulation of innate immune cells, such as monocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells. The activity is generally considered to be caused by the presence of high-molecular-weight polysaccharides in the mushrooms, although other constituents may also be involved. Clinical trials in cancer patients have demonstrated that G. lucidum products are generally well tolerated.[1]Many of the medical and scientific terms used in this summary are hypertext linked (at first use in each section) to the NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms, which is oriented toward nonexperts.”

Medicinal Mushrooms (PDQ®) – PDQ Cancer Information Summaries – NCBI Bookshelf
From Tea to treatment; Epigallocatechin Gallate and its potential involvement in minimizing the metabolic changes in Cancer

From Tea to treatment; Epigallocatechin Gallate and its potential involvement in minimizing the metabolic changes in Cancer

As the most abundant bioactive polyphenol in green tea, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a promising natural product that should be utilized in the discovery and development of potential drug leads. Due to its association with chemoprevention, EGCG may find a role in the development of therapeutics for prostate cancer. Natural products have long been employed as a scaffold for drug design, as their already noted bioactivity can help accelerate the development of novel treatments. Green tea and the EGCG contained within have become associated with chemoprevention, and both in vitro and in vivo studies have correlated EGCG to inhibiting cell growth and increasing the metabolic stress of cancer cells, possibly giving merit to its long utilized therapeutic use in traditional therapies. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that EGCG’s role as an inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade, acting upon major axis points within cancer survival pathways. The purpose of this review is to examine the research conducted on tea along with EGCG in the areas of the treatment of and/or prevention of cancer. This review discusses Camellia sinensis, as well as the bioactive phytochemical compounds contained within. Clinical uses of tea are explored, and possible pathways for activity are discussed before examining the evidence for EGCG’s potential for acting on these processes. EGCG is identified as being a possible lead phytochemical for future drug design investigations.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0271531719305007?dgcid=rss_sd_all&utm_source=researcher_app&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=RESR_MRKT_Researcher_inbound