Category: CBD and Cannabis

Health Hacker Australia > The Science > CBD and Cannabis
The Role of Cannabidiol (CBD) in Chronic Pain Management: An Assessment of Current Evidence | SpringerLink

The Role of Cannabidiol (CBD) in Chronic Pain Management: An Assessment of Current Evidence | SpringerLink

“Given the growing challenges in chronic pain management coupled with the ongoing consequences of the opioid epidemic, pain management practitioners are looking into more effective, innovative, and safer alternatives to treat pain. Cannabis-based medicine had been described for hundreds of years but only recently have we seen the more scientific, evidence-based approach to its use, and ongoing investigations continue to explore its potential medical benefits. While historically more attention has been paid to the psychoactive component of the cannabis plant Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), there have been fewer scientific studies on the medical use of the cannabidiol (CBD) – a non-psychoactive component of the cannabis plant.”

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11916-020-0835-4

Cannabidiol presents an inverted U-shaped dose-response curve in a simulated public speaking test. – PubMed – NCBI

Cannabidiol presents an inverted U-shaped dose-response curve in a simulated public speaking test. – PubMed – NCBI

“Compared to placebo, pretreatment with 300 mg of CBD significantly reduced anxiety during the speech. No significant differences in VAMS scores were observed between groups receiving CBD 150 mg, 600 mg and placebo.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30328956

Save Aussie Supplements – call to action

Save Aussie Supplements – call to action

Opinion – While unsafe products should be regulated, an individual should be free to research and trial compounds that may or may not yet have shown clear evidence or clinical trials for efficacy.

Medial technology and knowledge is constantly changing and we cannot be held ransom to a slow moving TGA locking up beneficial compounds simply because they’ve not yet tested or studied them.

Click the link below if you agree to show the TGA that we need and want access to supplements that can improve our health.

https://www.saveaussiesupplements.com.au/

Vaping is not dangerous, black market cartridges with hydrogen cyanide is though! – Opinion

Vaping is not dangerous, black market cartridges with hydrogen cyanide is though! – Opinion

While hysteria reins on news outlets and social media and some officials calling for or enacting laws to ban it, the real source of danger is the unregulated black market cartridges that contain some chemicals that turn to hydrogen cyanide when heated.

Saying vaping is dangerous is the same as saying water is dangerous. If misused or abuse anything can be dangerous.

This blog is trying to deliver the real truth without influences from politics or even laws. We want you to have the right information so you can make truly informed choices about your health.

It is estimated that vaping is 90% more safe than smoking. Most vape products contain less chemicals and less harmful chemicals. While it’s true we don’t know long term effects, it’s pretty safe to say that it’s a better way of consumption than burning and smoking material.

https://hightimes.com/news/report-shows-some-vapes-from-illicit-sources-contain-highly-toxic-pesticides/

Joint and separate exposure to alcohol and ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol produced distinct effects on glucose and insulin homeostasis in male rats | Scientific Reports

Joint and separate exposure to alcohol and ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol produced distinct effects on glucose and insulin homeostasis in male rats | Scientific Reports

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-48466-w

Watch “The Inside Story of Cannabidiol – What are the Benefits of CBD?” on YouTube

Watch “The Inside Story of Cannabidiol – What are the Benefits of CBD?” on YouTube

That Alarming CBD Liver Damage Study Is Bunk—And the Media Should Know Better | Leafly

That Alarming CBD Liver Damage Study Is Bunk—And the Media Should Know Better | Leafly

It’s 2019 and we still live in a world where one small study, on mice, with a highly questionable methodology, published in a marginal journal, with major flaws, leads to a clickbait media panic.

Recently, you may have seen a Forbes article headlined “Marijuana Study Finds CBD Can Cause Liver Damage” that reported on a study out of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

It’s scary stuff:

Shockingly, researchers discovered that the mice given higher doses of CBD showed signs of liver damage within 24 hours. To that end, 75 percent of these animals in the sub-acute phase had either died or were on the verge of death within a few days.

But this panic and misinformation is nothing new—back in 1974, a study conducted at Tulane University supposedly showed that “the active ingredient in marijuana [THC] impairs the brain circuitry,” leading the press to dutifully run articles claiming that pot causes brain damage without a trace of skepticism.

https://www.leafly.com/news/industry/alarming-cbd-liver-damage-study-is-bunk

CBD is not all rainbows and lollipops

CBD is not all rainbows and lollipops

We have an article and associated study that indicates possible liver damage from CBD use.

It’s worth noting that this was a mouse trial and only found in 10% of cases but either way you need to be aware of interactions.

After all CBD is a medicine and some medicines have side effects.

There are also known drug interactions due to CBD’s affect on how drugs are metabolised in the liver.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikeadams/2019/06/18/marijuana-study-finds-cbd-can-cause-liver-damage/#bd9b3c143ffa

Cannabis kills brain cells…. Right?

Cannabis kills brain cells…. Right?

Actually quite the opposite..

3 Studies That Show Cannabis Grows Brain Cells

Cannabis sativa L. and Nonpsychoactive Cannabinoids: Their Chemistry and Role against Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Cancer

Cannabis sativa L. and Nonpsychoactive Cannabinoids: Their Chemistry and Role against Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Cancer

In the last decades, a lot of attention has been paid to the compounds present in medicinal Cannabis sativa L., such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), and their effects on inflammation and cancer-related pain. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) currently recognizes medicinal C. sativa as an effective treatment for providing relief in a number of symptoms associated with cancer, including pain, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and anxiety. Several studies have described CBD as a multitarget molecule, acting as an adaptogen, and as a modulator, in different ways, depending on the type and location of disequilibrium both in the brain and in the body, mainly interacting with specific receptor proteins CB1 and CB2. CBD is present in both medicinal and fibre-type C. sativa plants, but, unlike Δ9-THC, it is completely nonpsychoactive. Fibre-type C. sativa (hemp) differs from medicinal C. sativa, since it contains only few levels of Δ9-THC and high levels of CBD and related nonpsychoactive compounds. In recent years, a number of preclinical researches have been focused on the role of CBD as an anticancer molecule, suggesting CBD (and CBD-like molecules present in the hemp extract) as a possible candidate for future clinical trials. CBD has been found to possess antioxidant activity in many studies, thus suggesting a possible role in the prevention of both neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. In animal models, CBD has been shown to inhibit the progression of several cancer types. Moreover, it has been found that coadministration of CBD and Δ9-THC, followed by radiation therapy, causes an increase of autophagy and apoptosis in cancer cells. In addition, CBD is able to inhibit cell proliferation and to increase apoptosis in different types of cancer models. These activities seem to involve also alternative pathways, such as the interactions with TRPV and GRP55 receptor complexes. Moreover, the finding that the acidic precursor of CBD (cannabidiolic acid, CBDA) is able to inhibit the migration of breast cancer cells and to downregulate the proto-oncogene c-fos and the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) highlights the possibility that CBDA might act on a common pathway of inflammation and cancer mechanisms, which might be responsible for its anticancer activity. In the light of all these findings, in this review we explore the effects and the molecular mechanisms of CBD on inflammation and cancer processes, highlighting also the role of minor cannabinoids and noncannabinoids constituents of Δ9-THC deprived hemp.

Source: Cannabis sativa L. and Nonpsychoactive Cannabinoids: Their Chemistry and Role against Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Cancer

Cannabidiol-loaded microspheres incorporated into osteoconductive scaffold enhance mesenchymal stem cell recruitment and regeneration of critical-s… – PubMed – NCBI

Cannabidiol-loaded microspheres incorporated into osteoconductive scaffold enhance mesenchymal stem cell recruitment and regeneration of critical-s… – PubMed – NCBI

Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 2019 Aug;101:64-75. doi: 10.1016/j.msec.2019.03.070. Epub 2019 Mar 24.

Source: Cannabidiol-loaded microspheres incorporated into osteoconductive scaffold enhance mesenchymal stem cell recruitment and regeneration of critical-s… – PubMed – NCBI

Rapid isolation of acidic cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. using pH-zone-refining centrifugal partition chromatography. – PubMed – NCBI

Rapid isolation of acidic cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. using pH-zone-refining centrifugal partition chromatography. – PubMed – NCBI

J Chromatogr A. 2019 Aug 16;1599:196-202. doi: 10.1016/j.chroma.2019.04.048. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Source: Rapid isolation of acidic cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. using pH-zone-refining centrifugal partition chromatography. – PubMed – NCBI

Emerging evidence for the antidepressant effect of cannabidiol and the underlying molecular mechanisms. – PubMed – NCBI

Emerging evidence for the antidepressant effect of cannabidiol and the underlying molecular mechanisms. – PubMed – NCBI

J Chem Neuroanat. 2019 Jul;98:104-116. doi: 10.1016/j.jchemneu.2019.04.006. Epub 2019 Apr 27. Review

Source: Emerging evidence for the antidepressant effect of cannabidiol and the underlying molecular mechanisms. – PubMed – NCBI

Cannabidiol protects livers against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis induced by high-fat high cholesterol diet via regulating NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammas… – PubMed – NCBI

Cannabidiol protects livers against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis induced by high-fat high cholesterol diet via regulating NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammas… – PubMed – NCBI

J Cell Physiol. 2019 Apr 29. doi: 10.1002/jcp.28728. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: Cannabidiol protects livers against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis induced by high-fat high cholesterol diet via regulating NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammas… – PubMed – NCBI

New Study Finds Most Online CBD Products Are Mislabeled | Herb

New Study Finds Most Online CBD Products Are Mislabeled | Herb

A new study found that many cannabidiol (CBD) products sold online are labeled with the wrong amount of CBD. The researchers analyzed a total of 84 CBD products that they purchased online and found that 26% contained less CBD than the package suggested, while 43% contained more CBD than the package suggested.

Source: New Study Finds Most Online CBD Products Are Mislabeled | Herb

New Study Reveals Regular Consumption of Cannabis Keeps You thin, Fit, and Active – Canna Chronicle

New Study Reveals Regular Consumption of Cannabis Keeps You thin, Fit, and Active – Canna Chronicle

Science is smashing all kinds of negative stigmas that were once thought about cannabis and the cannabis consumer.  Thanks to recent studies, people are re-learning everything they thought they knew about pot.  It is widely thought that “stoners” are “lazy, dumb, unproductive, unsuccessful and (my favorite) unhealthy”.  This couldn’t be farther from the truth and […]

Source: New Study Reveals Regular Consumption of Cannabis Keeps You thin, Fit, and Active – Canna Chronicle

The pharmacologic and clinical effects of medical cannabis. – Semantic Scholar

The pharmacologic and clinical effects of medical cannabis. – Semantic Scholar

Cannabis, or marijuana, has been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Several types of cannabinoid medicines are available in the United States and Canada. Dronabinol (schedule III), nabilone (schedule II), and nabiximols (not U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved) are cannabis-derived pharmaceuticals. Medical cannabis or medical marijuana, a leafy plant cultivated for the production of its leaves and flowering tops, is a schedule I drug, but patients obtain it through cannabis dispensaries and statewide programs. The effect that cannabinoid compounds have on the cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) and CB(2) ) found in the brain can create varying pharmacologic responses based on formulation and patient characteristics. The cannabinoid Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol has been determined to have the primary psychoactive effects; the effects of several other key cannabinoid compounds have yet to be fully elucidated. Dronabinol and nabilone are indicated for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy and of anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. However, pain and muscle spasms are the most common reasons that medical cannabis is being recommended. Studies of medical cannabis show significant improvement in various types of pain and muscle spasticity. Reported adverse effects are typically not serious, with the most common being dizziness. Safety concerns regarding cannabis include the increased risk of developing schizophrenia with adolescent use, impairments in memory and cognition, accidental pediatric ingestions, and lack of safety packaging for medical cannabis formulations. This article will describe the pharmacology of cannabis, effects of various dosage formulations, therapeutics benefits and risks of cannabis for pain and muscle spasm, and safety concerns of medical cannabis use.

Source: The pharmacologic and clinical effects of medical cannabis. – Semantic Scholar